Dogs

Does Your Dog Turn Into A Pancake?

I think we’ve probably all had moments like this. Those amazing times when we were having so much fun that we never wanted to leave. Of course, these are usually the times when you’re there with a friend who isn’t sharing your enthusiasm. So, that friend is forced to get creative in order to get you out of there, just like this guy does with the stick in his mouth.

Does Your Dog Turn into a Pancake?

I read an interesting article about this topic where the author called this type of behavior, “pancake dog.” I found that choice of phrasing quite appropriate. It’s where a dog, usually during the coarse of a walk, will lie down flat and refuse to move. Essentially turning into a big floppy pancake, that’s impossible to maneuver.

There are a few different reasons why your dog might do this. One reason, that’s generally seen in older dogs, is a health issue. If doggie has arthritis, hip problems or even if they are overweight, they might lay down and not want to go any farther. It’s the pain that drives them to it.

If pain is the reason your dog is “pancaking,” then giving them a moment to rest before coaxing them with a treat is a wise choice. Seeing a veterinarian is also a good idea. There are certain types of medication that can help relieve their achy joints.

Another, bigger, reason your dog might act this way is if poochie is afraid of something. Dogs will often lay down and resist movement if they come across a person, animal or object that frightens them. Forcing your dog past these obstacles could cause increased fear of them. It’s best to give fur face a reassuring moment to process this new thing. If they still resist, try to lead them away by using a trail of treats. Always reward them when they successfully overcome their fear and can walk past something that used to cause this reaction.

A third reason, which I believe to be the problem of the dog in the video, is just plain stubbornness. They don’t want their fun to end, so they take drastic measures, in order to stay a little longer. Treats are an excellent motivator for dogs. Laying out a trail of them will most likely get your dog moving.

Remember to give a treat when they leave without turning into a pancake. If you get them to do this, then going back for a short walk or game of catch could turn it into a fun sort of game for them. If they think there’s a chance that they might get to come back sooner, then they’ll likely be more willing to leave.

I bet this guy was kicking himself for not bringing treats along. He did an excellent job convincing his dog that the stick in his mouth was something worth getting up for. If you find something that works, stick with it. Consistency is the key. I doubt that his trick would work a second time, though.

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Julie Antonson

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